Magazine article Occupational Hazards

Study Examines AED Advisories

Magazine article Occupational Hazards

Study Examines AED Advisories

Article excerpt

Roughly one in five automated external defibrillators (AEDs) was affected by a recall or safety alert between 1996 and 2005, according to a study published in the Aug. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study's authors point out "numerous confirmed AED malfunctions occurred during the past decade." However, they also note "the total number of device malfunctions is small compared with the number of lives saved."

"Indeed, hundreds of thousands of patients underwent attempted resuscitation of ventricular arrhythmias by an AED during the study period, accounting for thousands of lives saved," conclude the study's senior author, William Maisel, M.D., MPH, director of the Pacemaker and Defibrillator Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and co-author Jignesh Shah, M.D., of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Cardiovascular Division.

That point is one John Hinson, president of Bothell, Wash.-based Cardiac Science Corp., emphasized in an interview with OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDS.

"I'm hoping the benefits of deploying AEDs to save lives will not get lost in some of the buzz surrounding the study itself," Hinson said. …

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