Magazine article The Christian Century

Tinseltown Expose

Magazine article The Christian Century

Tinseltown Expose

Article excerpt

TELEVISION CEMENTED stardom in the 1950s for many celebrities of radio, vaudeville and motion pictures--Lucille Ball, Milton Berle, even Alfred Hitchcock. The first TV star created by the infant medium was George Reeves. A capable actor with a Roman jaw, cast as Stuart Tarleton in Gone With the Wind (1939) and consigned to mostly forgotten pictures in the late 1940s, Reeves was offered the lead in a syndicated television program that was without sponsorship until two years after filming was completed. Take the money, his agent advised; nobody will ever see the silly thing anyway.

It was a sensible argument that could not have proved more wrong. Adventures of Superman (1951-1958) went through the roof. Five decades later, the original 104 episodes enjoy healthy sales in DVD sets from Warner Home Video. Lamentably, its only surviving actors, Jack Larson (Jimmy Olsen) and Noel Neill (Lois Lane), haven't received a penny in royalties in decades.

The case with Reeves was sadder. Typecasting was even crueler 50 years ago than it is today. Most of Reeves's supporting performance in one of his few A-pictures, From Here to Eternity (1953), landed on the cutting-room floor when preview audiences couldn't shake the impression that Burt Lancaster's character was chatting with Superman. Reeves's curse was not that he was a poor actor. Rather, he was the perfect television actor--affable and endearing in America's dens--at a time when movies were still the gold standard for fame-hungry performers without Clark Gable's draw. And so, when Reeves was found sprawled on his bed with a bullet in his head in June 1959, many--including the Los Angeles police--concluded that it was a suicide, probably stemming from the actor's depression at having arrived at his career's dead end.

From the beginning, however, there were doubts, based on circumstantial evidence at the scene and partly driven by suspicions of foul play voiced by Reeves's mother, Helen Bessolo. She hired a private detective to investigate the people and circumstances involved in her son's last days, and that is the story that Hollywoodland aims to tell.

It is a complex tale to translate onto the screen, and not only for the reasons just mentioned. For one thing, Reeves (played by Ben Affleck) had long been the paramour of Toni Mannix (Diane Lane), wife of MGM vice president Eddie Mannix (Bob Hoskins). Jealousy was no likely motive for suspected murder: Mannix himself had a Japanese mistress, with whom he, Toni and Reeves sometimes dined together, very much in public. …

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