Magazine article USA TODAY

New Orleans after the Flood: "In a City That Itself Resembles a Lost Civilization, Wrecked Rooms, Caved-In Houses, and Ravaged Neighborhoods Become Metaphors for the Fragility of Human Life."

Magazine article USA TODAY

New Orleans after the Flood: "In a City That Itself Resembles a Lost Civilization, Wrecked Rooms, Caved-In Houses, and Ravaged Neighborhoods Become Metaphors for the Fragility of Human Life."

Article excerpt

TO MARK THE FIRST anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent floods that devastated the Crescent City, the exhibition "New Orleans after the Flood: Photographs by Robert Polidori" features 20 large-scale images taken during four extended visits to Louisiana between September 2005 and April 2006. The quietly expressive photographs present a candid and intimate look at widespread urban ruin--an incomprehensible, topsy-turvy landscape of felled oak trees, houses washed off" their foundations, and tumbled furniture that leaves the viewer with more questions than answers.

Polidori, a staff photographer for The New Yorker, is drawn to record the disasters of our time and the failures of contemporary society. In his New Orleans photographs, as in his previous work in Havana, Versailles, and Chernobyl, he eschews nostalgia for the poignancy of absence. In a city that itself resembles a lost civilization, wrecked rooms, caved-in houses, and ravaged neighborhoods become metaphors for the fragility of human life. …

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