Magazine article CRM Magazine

Knowledge at the Point of Action: Six Principles for a Better Customer Experience

Magazine article CRM Magazine

Knowledge at the Point of Action: Six Principles for a Better Customer Experience

Article excerpt

Knowledge management is critical for getting and keeping customers.

Every time a company interacts with a customer, there is an exchange of knowledge. The quality of this knowledge exchange directly impacts the quality of the customer experience. And great customer experiences are essential for maximizing the lifetime value of customer relationships.

RightNow calls this strategy for optimization of the customer experience "knowledge at the point of action"--or KAPA. We've also identified six best practices for KAPA:

CAPTURE ALL RELEVANT TYPES OF KNOWLEDGE

Some of the knowledge required for a great customer experience can be found in a CRM database. But many other types of information are important as well. KAPA therefore requires effective management of all knowledge relevant to the customer experience, including:

* CRM DATA

* REAL-TIME PROCESS KNOWLEDGE SUCH AS SALES CYCLE STATUS OR THE AGE OF AN OPEN INCIDENT

* PRODUCT AND SERVICE KNOWLEDGE SUCH AS TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS AND PRICING

* COMPANY KNOWLEDGE SUCH AS STORE LOCATIONS AND REFUND POLICIES

* COMPETITIVE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT OTHER COMPANIES' OFFERINGS AND ACTIVITIES

* GENERAL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TECHNOLOGY, REGULATIONS, OR MARKETS

* ANALYTICAL INSIGHT SUCH AS CAMPAIGN RESPONSE RATES AND COMPLAINT TRENDS

Without this completeness of knowledge, companies can't respond quickly and efficiently to their customers--and will therefore fail to meet their customers' expectations.

MAINTAIN ACCURACY AND RELEVANCE OF KNOWLEDGE OVER TIME

Knowledge must be kept up-to-date. That's why knowledge management should be built directly into business processes. So, for example, a service rep who discovers that a customers phone number has changed should be able to update that information for everyone across the company.

Certain types of knowledge can also be given a "freshness date" to ensure that they are periodically reviewed. In addition, insight gained through explicit feedback (such as surveys and numeric ratings) and analysis of end-user behaviors should be used to further improve knowledge relevance.

FACILITATE KNOWLEDGE ACCESS

Knowledge must be available quickly to everyone involved in the customer experience. In fact, wherever possible, knowledge should be "pushed" to the user. Competitive alerts, for example, can be automatically emailed to salespeople. Screen pops can automatically present contact center agents with the caller's account data.

Customers should also be able to use whichever communication channel is most convenient for them at any given moment. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.