Magazine article Diverse Issues in Higher Education

ACE Report Cites Enrollment Gains, Retention Problems: American Indians Make Most Significant Gains at Master's Degree Level

Magazine article Diverse Issues in Higher Education

ACE Report Cites Enrollment Gains, Retention Problems: American Indians Make Most Significant Gains at Master's Degree Level

Article excerpt

The college enrollment of Hispanic students jumped nearly 70 percent between 1993-2003, while the number of Blacks earning bachelor's degrees in computer science and other science fields increased dramatically, according to a new American Council on Education report on the status of minorities in higher education.

Overall minority enrollment rose by 50.7 percent between 1993 and 2003, to total more than 4.7 million students. The number of White students remained relatively flat, growing by only 3.4 percent, to 10.5 million, according to the "Minorities in Higher Education Twenty-second Annual Status Report."

American Indians achieved gains in all degree categories over the period studied, with the most significant increase occurring at the master's degree level. Foreign students were the only group in 2003 to have earned more master's degrees than bachelor's and associate degrees combined.

While more minority students are enrolling in college, the percent actually walking out with degrees is troubling low, experts say.

Spelman College President Beverly Daniel Tatum attributes low retention rates to a lack of financial aid and preparation in K-12 education, including limited access to Advanced Placement and Honors classes in high school. …

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