Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Serosorting Limits HIV among Men Who Have Sex with Men

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Serosorting Limits HIV among Men Who Have Sex with Men

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON -- Serosorting--the selection of sex practices based on a partner's known or perceived HIV status--is becoming more popular among men who have sex with men, Dr. Robert M. Grant said at the Ryan White CARE Act clinical meeting on HIV treatment.

Increased serosorting may reduce the spread of new HIV infections in this population. "This trend suggests that we need to think of sexual risk in a new way," said Dr. Grant of the University of California, San Francisco.

HIV patients' choices of partners with the same HIV status for high-risk sex may explain a plateau in HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in recent years, Dr. Grant said. He cited the 2003 HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Annual Report from the San Francisco Department of Public Health, which showed a tapering off of annual HIV incidence in MSM locally from 4% in 1999 to 2.9% in 2003.

The San Francisco report also noted that receptive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among MSM decreased from 1999 to 2003, which suggests that HIV-negative MSM are using condoms or taking other precautions if they know their partners are HIV positive. …

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