Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Statin May Slow Lung Function Decline in Smokers

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Statin May Slow Lung Function Decline in Smokers

Article excerpt

SALT LAKE CITY -- Statin therapy may slow the decline in lung function in smokers and ex-smokers with chronic lung disease, Dr. Walid G. Younis said at the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians.

This preliminary finding from a retrospective observational study raises the intriguing possibility that statins might be able to prevent or at least slow progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or restrictive lung disease in smokers and former smokers, noted Dr. Younis of the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City.

He reported on 182 current and 303 ex-smokers, mean age 66 years, being followed at the Oklahoma City Veterans Hospital. Half of the patients were on statin therapy--predominantly simvastatin--for primary or secondary cardiovascular prevention. A total of 319 patients had COPD, 99 patients had restrictive fibrotic lung disease, and the remainder still had normal lung function.

The mean baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FE[V.sub.1]) was 57% of the predicted value. …

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