Magazine article UN Chronicle

Capturing Sun-Rays, Reaping the Wind

Magazine article UN Chronicle

Capturing Sun-Rays, Reaping the Wind

Article excerpt

Despite the environmental appeal and economic feasibility of using renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind Power, technologies in that area have "not yet found widespread use in either developed or developing countries", the Secretary-General reported on 6 January.

In a paper (E/C.13/1994/3) on developments in the field of new and renewable sources of energy, reviewed by the new UN body created to deal with that subject, it was stated that the share of new and renewable energy in total energy consumption in 1990 was 17.7 per cent. That share dropped to 1.6 per cent when only solar, wind and geothermal energy, as well as modern biomass utilization, were included (excluding large-scale hydropower and such traditional uses of biomass as the burning of fuelwood and charcoal).

The drop in oil prices during the middle and late 1980s led to a decline in investment in renewable energy sources, the report stated, but interest in such alternatives has been rekindled with a growing concern over the state of the environment, particularly the threat of global warming due to the carbon dioxide mankind pumps into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels and forests.

Estimates on the future growth of new and renewable energy sources vary, the Secretary-General said. The UN Solar Energy Group on Environment and Development estimated that such sources could make up for a 3 3 to 50 per cent share of the world's total energy consumption by the year 2020. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.