Magazine article Guitar Player

Swinging "That's No Way to Get Along." (Rev. Robert Wilkins Blues Song; Solo Guitar Teaching piece)(From Roots to Rock) (Brief Article) (Column)

Magazine article Guitar Player

Swinging "That's No Way to Get Along." (Rev. Robert Wilkins Blues Song; Solo Guitar Teaching piece)(From Roots to Rock) (Brief Article) (Column)

Article excerpt

If your blues universe begins with B.B. and ends with Stevie, this 18-bar Delta ditty will stretch your horizons. It has no V chord, and its harmony implies [sharp]9, major 6 and major 7 chords.

Reverend Robert Wilkins was born in Hernando, Mississippi, in 1896; he died in Memphis in 1987. Wilkins had a modest recording career from 1928 to 1935. During his second session in 1929, he cut "That's No Way To Get Along" in 2/4 using an open-Etuning (E, B, E, G[sharp], B, E, low to high).

We'll interpret the song in a swinging 4/4 time, similar to what Mick and Keith did when they rewrote the lyrics and recast the song as "Prodigal Son" on the Stones' Beggars Banquet. For convenience, let's also play the tune in standard tuning. We can remain faithful to the spirit of the music, since many of the idiosyncratic moves translate well from open-E.

For this fingerstyle blues, use your thumb on the three bass strings and your index and middle fingers on the trebles. …

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