Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

More Data Confirm Protective Effect of Juice on Alzheimer's

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

More Data Confirm Protective Effect of Juice on Alzheimer's

Article excerpt

Frequent drinking of fruit and vegetable juices substantially decreases the risk of Alzheimer's disease, reported Dr. Qi Dai of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., and associates.

Results of several studies have suggested that the antioxidants and polyphenols in dietary fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or delay its onset. Dr. Dai and associates hypothesized that intake of fruit and vegetable juices also might be protective. They tested their hypothesis using data from 1,836 subjects involved in the Kame Project, a large, population-based prospective study of Japanese Americans living in King County, Wash.

The subjects, aged 65 years or older at baseline (mean age 72 years), completed food frequency questionnaires and underwent periodic cognitive assessments. Over a mean of 6 years of follow-up, 81 incident cases of AD were diagnosed.

The risk of developing AD declined with increasing consumption of fruit and vegetable juices. Subjects who drank juice three times a week or more had a hazard ratio of 0.24, compared with those who drank juice less often than once a week. This protective effect was seen in subjects with all different levels of education, physical activity, and fat intake (Am. …

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