Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Exercise Improves Daytime Fatigue in Sleep Apnea Patients

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Exercise Improves Daytime Fatigue in Sleep Apnea Patients

Article excerpt

BOSTON -- Depression, metabolic syndrome, and lack of exercise exacerbate daytime sleepiness in obese patients with sleep apnea, Dr. Alexios Sarrigiannidis said at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society.

Dr. Sarrigiannidis and his colleagues in the Sleep Research and Treatment Center at Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, reviewed data for 708 consecutive patients, 470 men and 238 women, mean age 50 years, who had been referred for symptoms consistent with sleep apnea and had at least five episodes of apnea/hypopnea per hour. Mean body mass index was 34.9 kg/[m.sup.2] for men and 39.2 for women.

All of the participants completed the General Health Questionnaire to assess for depression, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and sleep habits; the Epworth Sleepiness Scale; and the Physical Activity Questionnaire. They were all assessed for metabolic syndrome and underwent one standard, 8-hour nocturnal polysomno-graphic recording.

Among men, the mean apnea/hypopnea index score (representing the total number of either apnea or hypopnea episodes/hr of sleep) was 39.9, significantly higher than the 29.2 reported in the women. Measures of sleepiness and physical activity were similar for both groups.

Of the study population, 39% of the men and 62% of the women met the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder, and 69% of the men and 68% of the women fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. …

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