Magazine article Geographical

Aboriginal Remains to Be Returned

Magazine article Geographical

Aboriginal Remains to Be Returned

Article excerpt

The Natural History Museum (NHM) is to return the remains of 18 Aboriginal people to Australia in line with new legislation introduced in 2005.

After considering advice from its Human Remains Advisory Panel, the museum's board of trustees decided to transfer the complete remains of 17 Tasmanian Aboriginals and the skull of an Aboriginal from the mainland back to Australia.

The Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) in Hobart will receive the Tasmanian remains after the NHM has collected morphological measurements and DNA samples from them. The skull will be returned to the Australian government.

Tasmania has been isolated for a significant period, and its native population was genetically distinct from other human populations, including those on mainland Australia. Through these differences, scientists can understand more about how people reached the island, how they lived and how they were linked with other human groups.

According to a statement issued by the TAC, the Tasmanian remains are believed to have been part of the private collection of George Augustus Robinson, 'chief protector' of Aboriginal people between 1839 and 1849. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.