Magazine article Diverse Issues in Higher Education

For-Profit Schools Popular Destination for Minorities

Magazine article Diverse Issues in Higher Education

For-Profit Schools Popular Destination for Minorities

Article excerpt

A disproportionate percentage of degrees from proprietary colleges go to Black and Hispanic graduates. While Black students earned 8.9 percent of bachelor's degrees in the United States during the 2004-2005 academic year, they accounted for 15 percent of the degrees conferred by proprietaries. And while Blacks earned 11.3 percent of associate degrees that year, they got 18.1 percent from the for-profit sector, according to data in the National Center for Education Statistics's latest report, "Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2005 and Degrees & Other Awards Conferred: 2004-05: First Look."

A similar pattern occurs for Hispanics, who earned 6.3 percent of bachelor's degrees, but 9.6 percent of the for-profit degrees that year. They also earned 10.4 percent of associate degrees but 14.2 percent from for-profits.

"The career colleges have long sought out minority students," says Mark E. Robbins, vice president for membership and communications at the Career College Association. "It's largely a population not well served by traditional higher education. …

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