Magazine article The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)

Bring on the Fence-Sitters: When It Comes to Supporting Our Interests, Most Players on the Early Slate of Presidential Contenders Are Neither Here nor There-Nor Anywhere. Here's Where They Sit on Our Gray Scale

Magazine article The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)

Bring on the Fence-Sitters: When It Comes to Supporting Our Interests, Most Players on the Early Slate of Presidential Contenders Are Neither Here nor There-Nor Anywhere. Here's Where They Sit on Our Gray Scale

Article excerpt

DENNIS KUCINICH, U.S. representative form Ohio

Supports just about every gay right imaginable and at a San Francisco press conference during the 2004 presidential campaign said that he believes same-sex marriage "is a fundamental civil rights issue. I can't, for the life of me, understand why I'm the only one who's taking this position with such emphasis."

JOHN McCAIN, U.S. senator from Arizona

Though he opposed a federal ban on same-sex marriage, he also opposed LGBT inclusion in hate-crimes laws and maintains that heterosexual marriage deserves special status. "I think that gay marriage should be allowed, if there's a ceremony kind of thing, if you want to call it that. I don't have any problem with that, but I do believe in preserving the sanctity of a union between man and woman," he said on Hardball.

TOM VILSACK, governor of Iowa

Supports extending bullying and discrimination protections to LGBT students, but told Radio Iowa in February 2006 that "we ought to honor commitment and I think we ought to value it in society because there's too little of it, but I don't think we necessarily have to redefine marriage to do it."

MITT ROMNEY, former governor of Massachusetts

Courted the gay vote in his state before donning his GOP-friendly anti--gay family cape. "If you indicate as a society that you're indifferent between a same-sex couple marrying and a heterosexual couple marrying, then it means our schools and other institutions are going to have to indicate that there is no difference whatsoever," he said on Hardball.

HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, U.S. senator from New York

Once considered marriage appropriate only between a man and a woman, but in October 2006 told roughly three dozen assembled LGBT leaders that she now sees her stance as "evolved" (a.k.a. someone else's problem). "I support states making the decision. I think that it should be in the political process, and if our governor and our legislature support marriage in New York, I'm not going to be against that."

BARACK OBAMA, U.S. senator from Illinois

Has written volumes against discrimination based on skin color yet curiously supports separate but equal civil unions. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.