Magazine article Newsweek International

The Best Architecture

Magazine article Newsweek International

The Best Architecture

Article excerpt

Byline: Cathleen McGuigan

It has been more than 20 years since the Prince of Wales blasted a proposed addition to the National Gallery in London as "a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a much-loved friend." Charles won that battle--the design was scrapped--but he lost the war. While he was railing, the stainless-steel Lloyds Bank building by Richard Rogers began to go up, sleek as an alien spaceship, among the stuffy office buildings in the City of London. And though the prince's taste might have given a brief boost to the postmodern design of the Thatcher era, the counterinfluence of Rogers and his cutting-edge colleagues, both in Britain and across the Channel, has only continued to grow.

Today that generation of designers has become one of Europe's most visible exports. Only Frank Gehry, alone among Americans, has had a bigger impact on contemporary architecture than the Europeans--though without the global reach of a Norman Foster, whose staff of 500, headquartered in London, oversees dozens of projects from Kazakhstan to China. Other high-profile Europeans have won big commissions in China, too--among them the 2008 Olympic Stadium by the Swiss team of Herzog & de Meuron, and the huge CCTV building by Rem Koolhaas of the Netherlands. And now Abu Dhabi is luring the leaders of European design, with plans unveiled in January to build an unprecedented cultural district, including buildings by Zaha Hadid of London and Jean Nouvel of Paris, as well as Gehry.

The talent and experience these architects bring to global clients have been honed at home, thanks to the enormous investment Europe has made, and continues to make, in its infrastructure. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.