Magazine article Artforum International

Rob Fischer: Mary Goldman Gallery

Magazine article Artforum International

Rob Fischer: Mary Goldman Gallery

Article excerpt

Whether grafting a house onto an airplane (as he did in Cargo Plane with Crate House, 1996), constructing stacks of domestic-style couches, or, in what has become a signature move, gutting, upturning, and slicing and dicing Dumpsters, Rob Fischer has developed a practice that links two established sculptural traditions: the found object and the post-Minimalist environment. For his recent exhibition, Fischer filled the space with a single work that fits nicely within his oeuvre, which habitually pits clunkiness against elegance, movement against stasis, and whim against rigor. This work, however, was both conceptually nimbler and more formally accomplished than any of the artist's previous projects.

Expanding on his recent works using salvaged floorboards, Fischer here ransacked a gymnasium. Joined together in planks ten boards wide, the reclaimed timber formed a path running throughout the space, turning always at right angles. It began with a ragged edge of unevenly aligned boards and ran down a wall and onto the floor, where paths one could walk on were interrupted as they turned vertical and then leveled out again in horizontals, occasionally turning upside-down. Along the way, blips and dashes of color--the remnants of lines that once delineated a basketball court--accentuated the directional flow of the work. Eventually, the path made a mad dash up another gallery wall, inched out onto the ceiling, and ended in another uneven edge.

While the conceit that the work somehow traced the route of a bullrider might have been a stretch, one didn't need the title, Bullrider's Advice, 2006, to make an association with the Minotaur's labyrinth. …

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