Magazine article U.S. Catholic

Nashville

Magazine article U.S. Catholic

Nashville

Article excerpt

Solomon Burke (Shout Factory, 2006)

In the 1960s Solomon Burke emerged as one of the greatest male rhythm and blues vocalists of the decade--and that's when Otis Redding was still alive. Unlike Redding, Burke survived those years and ever since has been billing himself as the King of Rock and Soul, and acting the part in a regal, ermine-trimmed robe.

The coming of disco and hip-hop ended Burke's days on the charts. But he enjoyed an artistic renovation after his 2001 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Burke's first album of this century, Don't Give Up on Me (Epitaph/Ada, 2002), was produced by gen-X singer-songwriter Joe Henry. It featured songs by Bob Dylan and Elvis Costello and won a Grammy for Best Contemporary Blues Album.

With his new album Nashville, he takes on the country category, and the result is a soul-stirring collection that exposes the shared roots of all-American popular music.

Burke went to the Nashville home studio of alt-country guitar-god Buddy Miller and recorded songs by mainstream Nashville hit-makers (George Jones, Dolly Parton, and others), along with a few by country left-fielders such as Gillian Welch, Patty Griffin, and Miller himself. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.