Magazine article Russian Life

The Kremlin Comes to St. Petersburg (Florida, That Is.)(Florida International Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida) (Special Issue Featuring the Women of Russia)

Magazine article Russian Life

The Kremlin Comes to St. Petersburg (Florida, That Is.)(Florida International Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida) (Special Issue Featuring the Women of Russia)

Article excerpt

Mark your calendar. From January 11 to June 11, 1995, the treasures of the tsars will be shown at the newly created Florida International Museum in downtown St. Petersburg, Florida. On display will he a magnificent collection of approximately 250 works of art from the Moscow Kremlin Museums. These artworks illuminate the social and artistic aspects of the lives of the tsars and tsarinas of the Romanov dynasty, which ruled Russia from 1613 to 1917.

Much of the history of the Romanovs has been ensconced behind the walls of the Moscow Kremlin since the October 1917 Revolution put an end to the dynasty. But the mystique surrounding the tsars and tsarinas lives on, and Americans will now have an opportunity to view this dazzling collection.

One of the largest and most prestigious collections of imperial family treasures ever to leave the Moscow Kremlin Museums, this exhibition includes creations of the great craftsmen of tsarist Russia. Exemplifying the luxurious tastes of the Russian royalty, Treasures of the Czars contains coronation uniforms and gowns, cloaks, crowns, thrones, and orbs and scepters. Also featured are treasures of the Russian Orthodox Church: golden chalices, icons, gilded covers for the Gospels, ornamental crucifixes, and ecclesiastical vestments and miters.

Items of major significance include the sarcophagus lid of Tsarevich Dmitri, who died mysteriously in 1591 at the age of nine; the icon measured to the size of the newborn son of Alexei Mikhailovich in 1654: the children's carriage presented to Peter the Great during his childhood: the sable-trimmed Crown of Monomach, used for the coronation of Peter the Great in 1682; the throne of Paul I; and the Romanov Tercentenary Egg, produced by the house of Faberge, which was a gift from the last tsar, Nicholas II, to his wife, Alexandra, in 1913. …

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