Magazine article Art Monthly

London

Magazine article Art Monthly

London

Article excerpt

Part of the redevelopment of what was the National Film Theatre and MoMI on London's South Bank (now reflagged as BFI Southbank, if we can get used to calling it that), is a new gallery space which will feature works made by artists working with the moving image. The gallery opened in March with new work by Jennifer & Kevin McCoy (until May 28), and the forthcoming programme announced so far includes Mark Lewis, Patrick Keiller and Faisal Abdu'allah, who will present his new project The Browning of Britannia. Currently presiding as head of exhibitions is Michael Connor, who previously worked as a curator at FACT Liverpool from 2002 to 2005, before moving with the appointment of former FACT chief executive and founder Eddie Berg in the autumn of 2004 as artistic director for BFI Southbank--though he is leaving shortly. The broader push of BFI Southbank is to open up the BFI's collections digitally and make a place that is easy to visit more than once, which MoMI never convincingly achieved. There is a two-year sponsorship deal with Hewlett-Packard in place, though, as if in some version of the current Mitchell & Webb ads, everyone was asked 'Mac or PC?' when leaving the launch party in order to be given the correct promotional memory stick on a rubber wristband (PR companies take note). The gallery programme, although cast somewhat in the shadows by all this--and by the unfinished debate about about whether the NFT should rethink the role of much-missed weekday afternoon screenings in promoting film culture--is naturally a focus of interest for artists working with the moving image, though perhaps not as much as it may have been a few years ago, in that so much work is now integrated into gallery programmes. …

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