Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

Leaving a Legacy of Excellence

Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

Leaving a Legacy of Excellence

Article excerpt

This is the third in a series of articles on the topics and issues that will be presented at the Finding Solutions to Issues Facing Local Community Leaders: A University Experience Leadership Training Institute Seminar scheduled for June 7-9 at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs in Syracuse, N. Y.

Leaving a strong legacy requires leaders to focus on ensuring that their performance standards are continued once they have left office. Previously mentoring was seen as a role that only top leaders would take on to ensure that the "best and the brightest" would move quickly through the organizational hierarchy thereby occupying key roles among the elite while granting credit and praise to the one offering the mentoring.

Continuous learning is more critical than ever to achieve high performance and success. Over the last decade, well-recognized scholars on organizational effectiveness have dramatically changed their view on the essential elements and functions of mentoring.

Mentoring was seen as a way to select and clone good leaders by replicating the positive attitude, knowledge, behaviors and skills displayed from the already established and successful mentor to the "hungry to be developed" mentee.

The top down, "I will tell you and show you" approach was widely accepted as a way to ensure the continued succession of top leaders in the organization, and to ensure the organizational culture would continue as a predictable and steadying force. …

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