Magazine article American Forests

3 Million Trees Planned for 2007

Magazine article American Forests

3 Million Trees Planned for 2007

Article excerpt

AMERICAN FORESTS' Global ReLeaf Forests program will plant 3 million trees this year in projects aimed at: replanting forests killed by wildfire, bugs, and drought; restoring unique habitats found only in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas; and improving habitat for animals and birds ranging from endangered red-cockaded woodpecker and bull trout to bald eagles and orangutans.

Global ReLeaf, which restores native forests for $1 a tree, has since 1988 planted 27 million trees in projects across the U.S. and around the world. Individuals and businesses can contribute to the Global ReLeaf program through AMERICAN FORESTS's website, www.americanforests.org or by calling 800/368-5748. Some of AMERICAN FORESTS' Global ReLeaf projects for 2007 are:

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* In California's Tahoe National Forest, 5,000 trees will increase bald eagle habitat, maintain plant diversity, reestablish tree cover, improve watershed stability, enhance scenic views, and increase wildlife habitat. And in Tehama County, a two-phase planting will improve habitat for various species of salmon in Battle Creek watershed.

* More than 550,000 native longleaf pines will restore a wildfire-damaged area, thanks to a partnership with National Forests of Florida. The endangered red-cockaded woodpecker will benefit.

* For sheer biological diversity and cultural importance, The Nature Conservancy's Emiquon Preserve's pre-European settlement landscape of backwater lakes, wetlands, and forests is virtually unmatched in the Midwest. A partnership between The Nature Conservancy of Illinois and AMERICAN FORESTS will begin to restore this Illinois River floodplain site by planting 160,000 bottomland hardwoods and reintroducing more than 10 different hardwood species once found there. …

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