Magazine article Arts & Activities

Corrugated Lighthouse Scenes

Magazine article Arts & Activities

Corrugated Lighthouse Scenes

Article excerpt

Living on Long Island affords its residents the opportunity of seeing many beautiful, natural habitats, especially various types of coastlines covered with magnificent sand beaches, marshlands, rocky bluffs and sand dunes. Many of these coastal areas also have wonderful old lighthouses, with the oldest one dating back to George Washington's commissioning of the Montauk Lighthouse in the 1790s.

Closer to our town of Bay Shore, the Fire Island Lighthouse is a popular destination, especially for our 4th-graders. As a part of their classroom studies, each student learns about our region's history and the important role that ocean navigation and lighthouses have had on all of our local inlets, bays and rivers. The students are also taught how the lighthouses have been restored, how the tides and storms have affected the eroding shorelines, and why lighthouses are still vital to our area's navigation.

As an enrichment/hands-on project, my 4th-graders had the opportunity to design and construct lighthouse scenes of their own using photographs and their own personal experiences of local lighthouses as inspiration.

Each student drew the largest lighthouse that they felt comfortable with, and chose a pattern to decorate it with. After the lighthouse was drawn, each section was sequentially numbered, so that corresponding pieces of corrugated paper could be cut out to match each piece of the lighthouse. Once cut, the pieces were reassembled and glued to the remaining piece of original white paper and trimmed, so that all of the edges were even and neat.

Next, a sheet of blue oak tag or railroad board was used as the background, and sand, gravel, grass, hills, dunes, boats, fish, birds, etc. were added to the scene. Here, the teacher can introduce (or reinforce) the idea of perspective and that each scene should have a foreground, a middle ground and a background, with the objects in the front being larger, and the items in the background getting smaller as they recede into the scene. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.