Magazine article Management Today

Crash Course in ... Job-Sharing

Magazine article Management Today

Crash Course in ... Job-Sharing

Article excerpt

One of your best performers has told you she won't be coming back after maternity leave ... unless you agree to a job-share. It's not an idea you're keen on, but the prospect of losing her is alarming, so how could you make it work?

Consider viability. Job-shares are much more successful in proactive, rather than reactive, positions with medium- to long-term objectives, says Azita Qadri, founder of specialist job-share recruiter Eat Your Cake. 'It works best in jobs where you can set your own agenda and plan ahead. If the job has lots of short deadlines or is at the sharp end of client service, it is less likely to work.'

Find the right person. The biggest hurdle might be finding the other half for the share; they need to be compatible in terms of personality. 'In the best job-shares, attitudes are similar but skills are complementary,' says Qadri. 'Look for team players. Aspiring job-sharers often find someone they've worked with successfully in the past to team up with; if you're a large company, you could keep a database of those interested in job-sharing.'

Divide the role. Some aspects of the role should be shared: strategy making, for example. But it is then better to divide the job into discrete objectives than to split every task in two, says Qadri.

Build in overlap. You can organise the time each job-share works in a number of ways: mornings and afternoons, two and a half days each, or even alternate days. But it's vital, says Lynette Swift, MD of flexible working specialists Swiftwork, that there is a handover period - 'even if it's just an hour, to brief each other on what's happened'. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.