Magazine article Newsweek

The Man Behind the Mask

Magazine article Newsweek

The Man Behind the Mask

Article excerpt

AS THE MAN BEHIND THE MASK, SUBcomandante Marcos had a certain allure. The media-savvy Zapatistas made him their standard-bearer during their revolt in the southern state of Chiapas a year ago--and Mexican women made him their idol. They blushed over his rebel pleas ("Why do we [guerrillas] have to sleep with our boots on and our souls hanging by a thread?"); they confessed to their psychiatrists that they dreamed of retreating to the mountains with him. The mystery man wouldn't tell interviewers his name or even his age. But if Mexican husbands could tolerate the competition, the country's leaders could not. Last week President Ernesto Zedillo cracked downn on the insurgents. Promising to return Mexico "to a state of law," he sent more than 1,000 soldiers and paratroopers deep into the Chiapas jungle. Their orders: capture the rebel leadership--especially Subcomandante Marcos.

Since taking office last December, Zedillo has blamed the guerrillas for many of his myriad problems, including the fall of the peso. He has struggled to restore confidence in his leadership, especially among hard-liners in his Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). One remedy, his advisers reasoned, was to seize control of the nagging Chiapas problem, which has driven away foreign investors. The Clinton administration, which is helping back the peso with a $20 billion aid package, last week called for restraint in Chiapas, but "Wall Street has hardly made a secret of wanting to see a stronger hand there," says a Mexican investment analyst. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.