Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

It's Business as Usual for Labour's Fattest of Cats

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

It's Business as Usual for Labour's Fattest of Cats

Article excerpt

* Hacks boarding Brown Force One, an ageing BA 767 commandeered to fly Big Gordie to Camp David, were surprised to be handed a Downing Street statement. The prose was billed as the premier's formal thoughts ahead of his encounter with George W, and duly appeared in the British media.

Curiously, the words turned out to be the bones of a Downing Street piece penned for the Washington Post. Curiouser still, in what is officially termed the post-spin era, was the 20-minute chat with the PM high over the Atlantic. No cameras, no tape recorders, no notebooks. To an incurable nostalgic, it was eerily reminiscent of the foreign forays of Blairways.

* The conspicuous loyalty to troubled Druggie Dave of David "Basher" Davis, the broken-nosed SAS reservist who leads the Tory right's paramilitary wing, is disturbing the Notting Hellers. What is the inveterate plotter up to, wondered a timid shadow minister who confessed to being frightened of the shadow Home Office operator. Modernisers fear that unless Cameron recovers in the polls, Davis, a civil libertarian, would guarantee Druggie a fair trial--then find him guilty of crimes against Conservatism and have him shot.

* That diehard Blairite Shona McIsaac ruffled feathers before the recess by repeatedly interrupting Big Gordie at a gathering of Labour shop stewards. Elected along with Helen Jones to the parliamentary committee after Joan Ruddock and Angela Eagle were presented with red boxes, the Cleethorpes chatterer evidently likes the sound of her own voice. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.