Magazine article Ebony

Women's Health, Queen Latifah & TV's Best

Magazine article Ebony

Women's Health, Queen Latifah & TV's Best

Article excerpt

One of the most frightening experiences that a woman can face is the diagnosis of breast cancer, a diagnosis that gives her two distinct options--to fight it or be consumed by it. Unfortunately, more and more women--some young, some older--are having to make that decision.

Despite medical advances and ongoing efforts to promote early detection, breast cancer continues to be the most common cancer diagnosis among African-American women. Further, Black women are more likely than White women to be diagnosed at later stages of the disease and are more likely to die as a result of it.

Medical experts say these figures could change dramatically if more women, who are nurturers by nature, took more time to take care of themselves first. October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, established to focus more attention on the disease through a nationwide campaign by the American Cancer Society and other organizations.

In this issue, we continue our tradition of spreading the message that early detection of breast cancer and prompt treatment not only save lives, but are directly related to the quality of life you experience after diagnosis. In the article on Dr. Olufunmilayo I. Olopade of the University of Chicago, she highlights new discoveries and efforts that can help breast cancer victims lead fuller, more productive lives. Thanks to these advancements, thousands of triumphant women are proceeding with their lives as breast cancer survivors. …

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