Magazine article Newsweek

The Strategist Turns Scribbler

Magazine article Newsweek

The Strategist Turns Scribbler

Article excerpt

It all came together one April night after dinner at Rupert Murdoch's house in Beverly Hills, Calif. William Kristol, Fred Barnes and John Podhoretz were standing m front of the fireplace when the Australian-born media tycoon agreed to bankroll the conservative trio's new project: a right-of-center weekly Washington magazine, The Standard. "Let's go ahead with this," Murdoch told his guests. That was all they needed to hear. "New magazines usually fail because they're undercapitized," Barnes told Newsweek. "Well, we're not going to have that problem."

This is not the usual, tentative, hope-this-works-out magazine launch. Murdoch's money combined with the founders' conservative star power, guarantees that. The fathers of Kristol and Podhoretz, Irving and Norman, founded neoconservative journals; Norman Podhoretz retired just last week as editor of Commentary. Despite these pedigrees, there's little chance The Standard will limit its audience to intellectuals. "We will be very engaged," says Kristol, who will be editor and publisher. "There is a tendency in American journalism to sit on the sidelines and grade the players. We aren't going to do that."

Kristol, the GOP's premier strategist, relishes realpolitik. A Harvard-trained political philosopher, he served as chief of staff to William Bennett and to Dan Quayle. Since 1992 he has run the Project for the Republican Future, which Murdoch, who also owns TV Guide and Fox, helped fund. There, Kristol became famous for faxing GOP leaders erudite memos urging Republicans not to compromise with Democrats; he crafted the potent "There is no health-care crisis" line that helped sink the Clinton health plan. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.