Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Indecision Is Final: Cookery Writers Are Always Changing Their Recipes-And Rightly So, Writes Nicholas Clee

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Indecision Is Final: Cookery Writers Are Always Changing Their Recipes-And Rightly So, Writes Nicholas Clee

Article excerpt

When you follow cookery writers over the course of their literary careers, you can be surprised to discover discrepancies in the advice they offer. They tell you to steam green beans in one book, and to boil them in the next. In Real Fast Food (1992), Nigel Slater writes: "I am convinced chicken tastes better, and is somehow juicier, when cooked on the bone"; in The 30-Minute Cook (1994), his line is: "A boned leg gives the juiciest grill." Surely it ought to be possible to give definitive advice?

One reason why cookery writers keep adapting their techniques is that they need constantly to come up with fresh recipes. But the desire to adapt is strong anyway. You get bored. You decide that you have arrived at the unimprovable way of making roast potatoes; and then you start to wonder whether the effort of heating the oil and turning the parboiled potatoes in it may be unnecessary, and whether simply pouring oil from the bottle on to the potatoes would produce just as good a result. You question whether the food science lore you have come to accept--such as that meat cooked on the bone is juicier--is invariably true.

I have written here about changing my mind on the matter of salt in the cooking water of dried beans. (You should leave out the salt, is my latest opinion.) Another subject on which I have to make a climbdown is chicken stock. On my shelves, I have one cookbook--Home Food by Richard Whittington--that suggests you simmer stock for eight hours, and another--How To Cook Better by Shaun Hill--that gives a timing of 40 minutes. …

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