Magazine article Art Monthly

Sarah Sze

Magazine article Art Monthly

Sarah Sze

Article excerpt

Sarah Sze Victoria Miro Gallery London September 1 to 22

In her spectacular installations, Sarah Sze takes the flotsam and jetsam of everyday life and transforms it into delicate sculptures that tower precariously in gravity-defying formations, in the process giving a new vitality to objects we often disregard. Anyone who has visited an exhibition of her work before will know what to expect from this latest show at Victoria Miro, yet it is easy to forget just how spellbinding her art is, with its endless list of objects colonising the gallery space, spreading up its walls and across its ceilings in structures that appear in equal parts epic and throwaway. Cotton-wool buds, bandages, plastic cups, safety pins, coloured pencils, chairs and angle-poise lamps spill across the space, inviting the viewer to look closely but certainly not touch--for fear of bringing the entire ensemble crashing to the ground.

The show contains two pieces, both of 2007, a new work entitled A Certain Slant and Tilting Planet, which was previously exhibited at the Malmo Konsthall in Sweden. Yet it is difficult to see the separations in the works, with each appearing to melt seamlessly into the other. Instead, Sze's art seems to have grown within the space, as if a small spillage of woollen thread and coloured cord has been left unattended and has bloomed, fungal-like, absorbing and incorporating everything around it. This sense of the organic is reiterated by Sze's use of natural elements alongside the man-made detritus. Grass stems appear to grow from the concrete floor of the gallery space, a leaf bats repetitively against a cup of bubbling water and piles of wood are combined to form unlit campfires, evoking the great outdoors. Upstairs, a long thread of blue wool reaches down from the ceiling before rippling out in ever-increasing circles on the floor, as if replicating water dripping delicately into a lake. The overwhelming impression though is of the sheer quantity of less-than-natural paraphernalia that forms the stuffing of our lives--tea bags, water bottles, phone books, Oyster cards and FedEx boxes also all make an appearance--and, in the green-conscious times that we are living in, it is difficult not to wonder whether Sze is making an ecological point. If she is, it is certainly not a militant one, for the sheer joy of the work quickly dispels more serious ponderings. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.