Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Roadblock Hits Stephen Colbert Campaign for President -- A Commie Plot?

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Roadblock Hits Stephen Colbert Campaign for President -- A Commie Plot?

Article excerpt

Comedian Stephen Colbert has been saying he'll be running a presidential campaign in early voting South Carolina -- and he'll be reaching millions of voters Sunday when he appears on NBC's "Meet the Press" -- but he may have trouble getting on a ballot.

And he may face Federal Election Commission sanctions, as well.

Democratic Party rules require a candidate to be deemed a viable contender to gain access to the ballot for the tentatively scheduled Jan. 26 primary. Republicans won't let a candidate alter his application, which Colbert may have done on his TV show when he struck out part of a statement saying he would not violate election law.

Colbert, a South Carolina native, announced his intention to run for the White House on his Comedy Central show "The Colbert Report" this week, saying he would run only in this key primary state.

Besides the viable-candidate qualification, South Carolina Democrats also say a candidate must have actively campaigned in the state to get on the ballot.

That would seem to be a problem for Dennis Kucinich, the Ohio congressman, and Mike Gravel, a former Alaska senator, as well as for the comedian.

Colbert said he planned to run both as a Democrat and as a Republican - so he could lose twice.

The GOP doesn't have a requirement for how much a candidate must campaign in the state or whether he has a chance to win. State GOP Chairman Katon Dawson said altering the candidacy application is one of the few things that can keep someone off the ballot. …

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