Magazine article Management Today

Masterclass: 'First 100 Days' Plans

Magazine article Management Today

Masterclass: 'First 100 Days' Plans

Article excerpt

What are they? New hires and the newly promoted often find themselves being judged after the apparently arbitrary deadline of 100 days. The figure has a plausible roundness to it, hinting at something significant. You might feel that business life has got fast enough already, without having to deliver meaningful change in just over three months. On the other hand, the markets expect quarterly figures from most companies, so maybe 100 days is not such a weird deadline. Blame Jack Kennedy if you want. At his inauguration in 1961, he spoke explicitly of the nation's expectations for his first 100 days - there was no looking back after that.

Where did they come from? In fact, it was an earlier US president who got the 100-day bandwagon rolling. When Franklin D Roosevelt entered the White House in the wake of the Depression of the early 1930s, he instigated a radical 100-day plan to reform the failing US economy. …

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