Magazine article Editor & Publisher

'Wash Post' Multimedia Probes Deadly Legacy of Israeli Cluster Bombs in Lebanon

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

'Wash Post' Multimedia Probes Deadly Legacy of Israeli Cluster Bombs in Lebanon

Article excerpt

Accompanying a Washington Post report in print on Sunday, the newspaper at its Web site launched a multimedia offering on the deadly legacy of cluster bombs used by Israel in its bombing of Lebanon last year.

The site offers audio reports, graphics, a slide show and test.

Here is part of the text. The rest is at www.washingtonpost.com.*

Rasha Zayoun grimaced as she lifted herself onto her one leg and spun from her bed into a wheelchair. Her torment wasn'tfrom her amputated left foot, mangled beyond repair when an Israeli cluster bomblet exploded in her home in southern Lebanon in January; it was from her remaining foot, speckled with shrapnel and so stiff from lack of use that putting her weight on it shot jolts of pain all the way to her face. She was 17 when she found the explosive in a bag of wild thyme that her father had brought home. "I thought it was a toy," she said.

At least 60 countries have cluster bombs, according to Human Rights Watch. Defense ministries, including the Pentagon, say the bombs work well against enemy troop formations and armored vehicles, but the civilian toll can be dire. Once dropped, the munitions scatter hundreds of bomblets randomly over a wide area, many of which fail to explode and linger on as de facto landmines. …

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