Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Antisocial Personality Disorder Blunts HIV Treatment Benefits

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Antisocial Personality Disorder Blunts HIV Treatment Benefits

Article excerpt

MONTREAL -- Comorbid antisocial personality disorder blunts the brain dysfunction associated with HIV/AIDS but also the brain benefits associated with antiretroviral therapy, reported Lance Bauer, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of Connecticut, Farmington.

"There is good evidence that both ASPD [antisocial personality disorder] and HIV affect the same regions of the brain," he said at the annual conference of the EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society.

The prevalence of ASPD is disproportionately high in the HIV/AIDS population, with one study estimating it as high as 74%, making it important to screen for this psychiatric disorder, he said in an interview. The diagnosis of ASPD "may provide a context for the treatment plan. Such patients may require more frequent follow-ups to deal with compliance issues or may require a more structured approach for their treatment--for example, greater involvement of the spouse or family member, or simplifying the treatment regimen."

In his published study, which he presented at the meeting, Dr. Bauer compared the effect of ASPD on brain function in 26 treated and 71 untreated HIV patients, compared with 68 seronegative controls using the P300 event-related potential (ERP) test (Neuropsychobiology 2006;53:17-25). …

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