Magazine article Mortgage Banking

Technobabble

Magazine article Mortgage Banking

Technobabble

Article excerpt

Technobabble this month would like to announce the unofficial results of some informal contests we concocted out of thin air. The winners have not been notified and the selection process was completely random. Also, no purchase was necessary to compete in these contests. In the tradition of this column, participants were completely unaware they were even partaking in these contests. [??] With those disclaimers out of the way, here are the contest categories: 1) Most unsupported claims in a technology-related press release; 2) Most frequent use of the word "solutions" in a technology-related press release; and 3) Most unnecessarily capitalized words in a single sentence in a technology-related press release.

1 Here we go with category one. This category is the one where one would suspect the competition to be pretty stiff. The most unsupported claims in a press release is a toughly contested category for any type of press release--but technology releases sometimes take this to a high art form.

Our winner had three powerful and totally unsupported claims in the course of a two-page release. The first unsupported claim in this release states the product is "the leading loan servicing software solution for the lending industry." No market-share numbers or outside research data were supplied supporting this claim. The second unsupported claim says that up until now, the kind of automated integrated systems capability this new strategic partnership between two companies is designed to provide was only available to "large banks and national servicers." But with the release of this new product partnership between a servicing software solution provider and a foreclosure trustee service provider, these same capabilities and functions are available "at an unbeatable price." It's this last part of the claim that seems a bit unsupported to us. Finally, the release states the product was "consistently rated superior" in design, system interface, expandability and ease of use. Just believe it--OK.

2 Our second contest produced a clear winner. The winner here used the word "solution" or "solutions" seven times in a four-paragraph release. The company resisted using the word in the headline, which, strangely, under our twisted rules actually lost it points. We are quite sure there are many more releases out there that beat this total number of uses of the word "solution." But we only considered press releases that crossed our desk in the last two months, and as we said, the rules governing our selection process are quite random anyway. …

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