Magazine article Geographical

Telling Geography's Stories

Magazine article Geographical

Telling Geography's Stories

Article excerpt

While we were putting together this issue of Geographical, a flurry of those 'Oh woe is geography teaching' stories appeared in the national press. As usual, they were reporting the results of a survey into children's geographical knowledge, this time based on questions about the location of Mount Everest, the identity of the world's longest river and so forth.

Well, to be embarrassingly candid, I only scored one out of three in the Guardian's scaled down version of the survey questionnaire. And to be honest, I reckon I would score equally badly in those 'point to country X on a map' tests that seem to get trotted out with tedious regularity to tell the same story.

But despite this indication of my apparent ignorance, I would still like to think that my geographical knowledge is pretty good. Why? Because I don't believe that geography is just about facts and figures, as interesting as they may be; it's also about processes and connections.

So, I may not have known which river is the world's longest, but I know about delta formation and its importance to agriculture and, indeed, the birth of civilisation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.