Magazine article The Fader

Kavinsky Bring Theme Music Back to Life

Magazine article The Fader

Kavinsky Bring Theme Music Back to Life

Article excerpt

Halfway through Kavinsky's Dead Cruiser EP, in a brief interlude titled "Flashback," is a real soundclip from local morning show Good Day LA's coverage of a then-mysterious 2006 daybreak car crash on the Pacific Coast Highway involving a million dollar Ferrari Enzo and a vanished driver-the excited banter of the anchor and traffic reporter sensationalized by Kavinsky's computer emulated Yamaha DX7 stabs. It's the news made to sound like the action flick the reporters wish it was, made possible by the same instrument-or an imitation of it-that defined Beverly Hills Cop and Miami Vice. It's also the ideal set up for the Kavinsky creation myth: supercool racer wrecks his Testarossa in 1986 and disappears, only to return as a tad zombie 20 years later.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The genius behind all the Jan Hammer-ing and dead man walking of Kavinsky is Vincent Belorgey, who isn't a trained musician but an aspiring auteur who needed a soundtrack. "My morn tried to send me to piano lessons when I was a teenager, but it was during my favorite cartoon so I didn't go," he explains through a translator. "I find a sound I like and play it on the computer totally out of feeling." And that feeling is totally borrowed from pop culture touchstones. When asked who his influences are, Belorgey only references films: Dario Argento's Phenomena, John Carpenter's The Thing, Toyoo Ashida's seminal Japanese anime feature Vampire Huntel D and the scoring work of Giorgio Moroder and Ennio Morricone. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.