Magazine article Dance Magazine

Briana Evigan

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Briana Evigan

Article excerpt

On Valentine's Day, Step Up 2 the Streets hits the big screen. This follow-up film to the 2006 success, Step Up gives audiences a role reversal--Briana Evigan, 21, plays Andie, a hip hop dancer from the streets who tries to fit into the Maryland School of the Arts. She brings her attitude to classes, and finds a way to stay true to her dance roots by forming a crew to compete in the underground dance scene. Emily Macel talked to Evigan about starring in her first feature film. See www.myspace.com/stepupmovie.

What is your dance background? I've been studying dance for about 12 years. I started off as a hip hop dancer with Shane Sparks. I studied ballet and jazz, which got me into African and Krumping and break dancing. My style of dance is street hip hop--a mix of ghetto hip hop and sexy style. I worked with a dance company called E-Funk for two years before the movie. They had sexy girl vibe and we performed all over the place.

The choreographers for the movie, Jamal Sims, Hi-Hat, and Dave Scott, are some of the hottest in the field. What is it like to work with them? They are so different. Jamal and Rhapsody (his assistant) brought a real fun energy. The choreography was easy to catch onto because it was a lot like Shane Sparks' style. Dave Scott's was harder because I'd never gotten into the whole popping thing. Hi-Hat was all tricks and flips and spinning on your head. I had my ups and downs, and it was very difficult, but I got it all finally after a month of training.

How much creative freedom did you have? No matter what they gave me, my style was coming out with their choreography, so there was that freedom of not having to exactly copy them. They gave me a chance to freestyle and show them what worked for me and what didn't. They pushed me on some of the moves I didn't know I could do.

Did you go to dance battles to research your role for the film? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.