Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Use of Quantitative EEG Can Individualize Therapy

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Use of Quantitative EEG Can Individualize Therapy

Article excerpt

MONTREAL -- Psychiatrists can further the quest toward more evidence-based medicine by treating the neurophysiologic origins of behavioral disorders, David Cantor, Ph.D., said at the annual conference of the EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society.

With the use of quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) to identify specific abnormalities in brain function, psychiatric therapy can be individualized to address subtleties that may not correlate well with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, said Dr. Cantor of Duluth, Ga., who is president of the society.

"Many roads lead to Rome, and there are many different types of abnormal brain physiology that can result in what we call attention-deficit disorder, depression, or any of the other psychiatric disorders," he said in an interview.

"We need evidence of abnormal brain function in order to show there's a physiologic need for a drug or therapy, and then we need information about the specific nature of the abnormality to help us select" a drug or therapy, Dr. Cantor said.

Using attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as an example, he said that most current diagnostic and pharmacotherapeutic approaches fail to distinguish between subtle variations.

"Whether a patient has ADD or strictly a hyperactive impulsive problem, or whether they have a combination of both, all of these subtypes get prescribed Ritalin at first pass. …

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