Magazine article Policy & Practice

Campaign Aims to Reduce Unplanned Pregnancy among Single, Young Adults

Magazine article Policy & Practice

Campaign Aims to Reduce Unplanned Pregnancy among Single, Young Adults

Article excerpt

Teen pregnancy is closely linked to many other social issues--poverty and income, overall child well-being, out-of-wedlock births, responsible fatherhood, health issues, education, child welfare and other risky behavior.

Like teen pregnancy, unplanned pregnancy among young adults is at the root of some important public health and social challenges. Unplanned pregnancies are frequently resolved by abortion--1.3 million in the United States in 2001. Although many Americans differ in their views about abortion, virtually all see value in lessening the need for abortion and would prefer that fewer women have to confront an unplanned pregnancy in the first place.

In the most recent year for which good data are available, there were about 567,000 births from pregnancies that women themselves say they did not want at the time of conception or ever in the future. These children are particularly vulnerable. Even when taking into account various social and economic factors, women experiencing an unplanned pregnancy are less likely to obtain prenatal care, and their babies are at increased risk of low birth weight and being born prematurely. They are also less likely to be breastfed.

But help is on the way. To stimulate interest and understanding of the scope of the unplanned pregnancy problem in the United States, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, in Washington, D.C., sponsored a forum in October 2007 focused on being 20-something in the 21st century. A wide range of participants, including authors, social scientists, marketing executives, political strategists, policy leaders and journalists participated in the forum to discuss unplanned pregnancy among young adults and explored remedies.

According to Sarah Brown, chief executive director of The National Campaign, the organization wants to improve the lives and future prospects of children and families and, in particular, to help ensure that children are born into stable, two-parent families committed to and ready for the task of raising kids. The group's strategy is to prevent teen pregnancy and unplanned pregnancy among single, young adults, and supports a combination of "responsible values and behavior" by men and women and responsible policies in the public and private sectors. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.