Magazine article Artforum International

Franz Ackermann

Magazine article Artforum International

Franz Ackermann

Article excerpt

Where the hell is Franz Ackermann anyway? This is the question that inevitably arises when viewing the work of this Berlin-based artist who wanders from one geographic location or cultural situation to the next, looking for new experiences, and maybe even a little meaning. If Ackermann belongs anywhere, however, it may well be in one of his small, almost hallucinatory "Mental Map" paintings, 1994 - 95.

Living life in the form of a continuous trip, with requisite stopovers in his native Germany, Ackermann seems to have found a degree of romance in the notion of world citizenship. In connection with his Los Angeles exhibition (entitled "properties"), the artist spent a few weeks exploring the local environment, and even used L.A.'s neglected bus system (only the city's disenfranchised or bold out-of-towners intent on a messy urban adventure would actually do that sort of thing. But from this artist's delightfully skewed perspective, the world is a messy place, and he's loath to tidy it up. Ackermann's eccentric, almost accidentally ornamental paintings and blueprints became metaphors for this nomadic sense of place. His subjective maps aggressively decomposed the territorial order usually associated with planned suburban spaces, willfully interfering with the representational protocol of topographical systems. All of this seemed, at least in part, like an effort to obstruct any sort of stable identity, to proclaim "selfhood" as something that is entirely contingent and fluid, or just plain fugitive.

Ackermann may well thrive on those states of mental and physical disorientation that many find irksome. By courting an outsider status, he accentuates the idiosyncratic, and it is not entirely coincidental that his artistic language bears an oblique resemblance to certain kinds of "outsider art." It goes without saying that there is a long tradition of artists and writers who have fueled their imaginations by pursuing the kind of bliss that comes from getting lost in unknown places, who have become addicted to a sense of estrangement or alienation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.