Magazine article Artforum International

Matthew Buckingham: Murray Guy

Magazine article Artforum International

Matthew Buckingham: Murray Guy

Article excerpt

"Someone with historical sense sees reality differently: in four dimensions," notes historian Gordon S. Wood. "If it is self-identity that we want, then history deepens and complicates that identity by showing us how it has developed through time." Artist Matthew Buckingham clearly possesses this historical sense, and his nuanced understanding of time has informed a decade's worth of installations that use time-based media (film, video, and slide projection) to imaginatively conflate past and present. Buckingham's alignments of story and image, whether anchored in dry historical fact or conjured from evocative fragments, are palimpsests that instruct and entertain, expanding viewers' sense of identity. This exhibition featured two recent installations, one of which ranks with A Man of the Crowd, 2003, as among the artist's best to date.

False Future, 2007, resurrects the little-known life story of Louis Le Prince, the French inventor who is now credited with discovering how to record motion pictures onto film several years before the better-known Lumiere brothers. The narrator of Buckingham's ten-minute 16-mm film, speaking in French subtitled in English, describes Le Prince's late-1880s experiments with recording technology and relates his mysterious disappearance from a Dijon-Paris train in September 1890, just prior to a trip to the United States on which he was to promote his camera. Among the items discovered after his vanishing was a twenty-frame (one-second) fragment of footage shot at the Leeds Bridge in England in October 1888. Buckingham's film was shot from the same spot, and depicts pedestrians and white double-decker buses--substitutes for the horse-drawn carriages and strollers in Le Prince's fragment--crossing the bridge in slanting late-afternoon light. The image, projected onto a white sheet strung diagonally across the middle of the gallery, likewise echoes the work of the earlier inventor, who is said to have tested his films at night in his Leeds workshop in a similar manner. …

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