Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Depression May Predict PTSD in Some Cardiac Patients

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Depression May Predict PTSD in Some Cardiac Patients

Article excerpt

BALTIMORE -- Depression at hospital admission and the recurrence of cardiac symptoms in the first year appear to predict the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms at 3 years in patients with acute coronary syndrome, results of a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society show.

Anna Wikman, a PhD student in psychobiology at University College London, and her colleagues recruited 284 patients with acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction [MI] and unstable angina) while in hospital. Seven to 10 days after admission, patients completed a questionnaire about posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Twelve months later, 213 were reassessed with a telephone interview and self-completion of a questionnaire. This was repeated at 36 months with 179 patients.

The average age was 61 years, and most patients (77%) were men. Whites accounted for 85%. In all, 72% had experienced an ST-segment elevation MI. In the 12 months after admission, 22% had experienced recurrent cardiac symptoms. Depression scores on the Beck Depression Inventory were elevated, with one-third of patients scoring at least 10 or greater. …

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