Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Smoking May Increase Risk of Developing Neuropathic Pain

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Smoking May Increase Risk of Developing Neuropathic Pain

Article excerpt

ORLANDO -- In a community sample of 205 adults with chronic pain of any type, neuropathic pain was documented in almost two-thirds of those who smoked, compared with one-third of those who did not smoke, Dr. Todd G. Call reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.

"The results were a little bit of a surprise to us, but it appears that smoking seems to confer a greater risk of neuropathic pain. We're not quite sure why that is. It's too early to say. The study really wasn't designed to look at that, but it's worth looking into further," Dr. Call of the Mayo Medical School Rochester, Minn., said in an interview.

Dr. Call and his colleagues sought to validate a method of screening for neuropathic pain in adults with chronic pain living in the community.

They identified a subset of adults with self-reported nerve pain, and confirmed the diagnosis according to scores on the self reported Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale and select ICD-9-CM codes associated with neuropathic pain on chart review.

Neuropathic pain was confirmed in 75 of the 205 patients. The remaining 130 patients had chronic, nociceptive pain. Overall, 13% of the participants smoked, but among patients in the neuropathic pain subset, 21% were smokers. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.