Magazine article Management Today

Business Is Good for You after All

Magazine article Management Today

Business Is Good for You after All

Article excerpt

Nobody likes a lawyer. Nobody likes a journalist. Nobody likes a banker. In fact, with the possible exception of doctors (who come top of the `respectable profession' list invirtually every society), nobody thinks much of anybody else's profession.

In Britain, business has suffered more than most. Even at the height of empire those working in `trade' were looked down upon. For a large part of this century, successful business people were often perceived as mercenary, with the scruples and skills of wartime black marketeers. More recently business has been viewed in this country as dull and unimaginative, with any right-thinking young person spurning it in favour of the professions, the media or the City. The most exciting thing that ever happened to British business was James Hanson stepping out with Audrey Hepburn.

Suddenly but imperceptibly, the status of business has changed. It's noteworthy that the terminology employed in the political debate on `stakeholder society' is drawn straight from the language of business. The success in mainstream publishing of Charles Handy and Will Hutton says a great deal about the new focus on good business and management. There are ever-increasing numbers of television programmes on business, and news coverage is no longer restricted to job losses and share prices. In the run-up to the General Election, politicians are arguing about what will be the best environment for UK business to thrive -- with it being taken as read that what is good for business is good for Britain. …

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