Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Reducing Salt Intake Could Help Combat Childhood Obesity

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Reducing Salt Intake Could Help Combat Childhood Obesity

Article excerpt

Dietary salt intake significantly drives consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks in children and adolescents, an analysis of British survey data has shown.

This is the first time such a link has been described in young people, Dr. Feng J. He of St. George's Hospital, University of London, and associates wrote in the journal Hypertension. The study used data from a National Diet and Nutrition Survey of 1,688 U.K. children aged 4-18 years.

After establishing a highly significant association between salt intake and consumption of fluids of all types and noting that about 80% of people's salt intake is "hidden" in processed foods, the researchers wrote that reducing salt intake by half in children aged 4-18 years would in turn reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks by about 567 g (2.3 drinks) per week per child, due to decreased thirst.

The result would be a reduction of about 244 kcal in sugar per child per week, which in the long term could help reduce childhood overweight and obesity. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.