Magazine article Opera Canada

Seattle Opera's

Magazine article Opera Canada

Seattle Opera's

Article excerpt

Three important singers determine the success or failure Tosca, all requiring what the Italians call spinto voices. A light, lyric soprano can sing all the notes, and can, perhaps, like Canadian Michele Capalbo, in the second cast of Seattle Opera's Jan.-Feb. production, project big top notes to cut through Puccini's brilliant, heavy orchestration. But much of the rest of her singing failed to make it past the pit. When it did, it lacked the power to convey the intensity of Tosca's emotions.

Capalbo is a fine lyric soprano--pretty, petite, and moving well on the stage. She did not, however, prove a memorable Tosca. She has in fact been singing other heavy roles (the Verdi Leonoras, Violetta, Desde-mona, Lady Macbeth, and Butterfly) with no apparent damage to her voice. She never forces, and her tops are of "spinto" quality. But Tosca demands a singer who can appear to throw caution to the winds and whose lower and middle ranges can convey passion. In this respect, Capalbo could not match Lisa Daltirus, the first cast Tosca, who had everything one hopes for in the role. Because her technique was solid and invisible, she was able to throw her operatic temperament into the role with abandon. The drama expressed in her voice was especially intense and convincing. …

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