Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Hormone Replacement Therapy and Ovarian Cancer

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Hormone Replacement Therapy and Ovarian Cancer

Article excerpt

Since the early 1990's, doctors have prescribed synthetic hormones to older women in order to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause, such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, and vaginal dryness. These symptoms occur as the body adjusts to decreased levels of estrogen. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can mean either taking estrogen alone or taking estrogen plus progesterone or progestin, a synthetic hormone with effects similar to those of progesterone. These two hormones are involved in regulating a woman's menstrual cycle.

Estrogen therapy alone is usually prescribed only for women who have had a hysterectomy. Progestin prevents the overgrowth of cells in the lining of the uterus, which can lead to uterine cancer. In contrast, estrogen plus progestin is typically recommended for women with an intact uterus. Hormones may be taken daily ("continuous" therapy) or on only certain days of the month ("sequential" therapy). Over the past decade, several studies have reported an increased risk of ovarian cancer with the long-term use of HRT. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.