Magazine article CRM Magazine

Ignorance Is the Remedy Du Jour

Magazine article CRM Magazine

Ignorance Is the Remedy Du Jour

Article excerpt

TOO MANY contact center managers are measuring and addressing the wrong problems. It's the equivalent of a doctor prescribing statins to someone with high cholesterol--a remedy that fails to address the plaque (or festering sores) that a heavily meat-based diet will deposit along artery walls. According to John McDougall, M.D., it was the eruption and subsequent clotting of one of these sores that killed Tim Russert, one of the most respected political journalists of our time, at the young age of 58. Unfortunately, he fell victim to a silent killer, one that has claimed the lives of millions of Americans.

Some commentators noted that Russert had had a negative stress test within two months of his death. Stress tests, according to McDougall, do not account for the collection of tiny sores in arteries. And yet Russert's untimely death--and the deaths of countless others--could have been prevented had he eaten a proper diet consisting of more fruits and vegetables. (For more on this, read McDougall's column, "A Posthumous Interview by Tim Russert, Former Host of 'Meet the Press,'" at www.drmcdougall.com.)

Naturally, my fellow journalists and I were shocked and saddened by the news of Russert's early passing. I admired his journalistic integrity, his tough-but-fair style of interviewing, and his penchant for finding the truth. Russert will likely be remembered by others as the longest-serving host of Meet the Press and as an NBC political correspondent who adeptly covered the most-contested presidential election in U. …

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