Magazine article Newsweek

Diabetes Mellitus

Magazine article Newsweek

Diabetes Mellitus

Article excerpt

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common, serious and costly disease that creates "epidemic challenges" in America. Approximately 16 million persons have DM, but only half, or 8 million, of these people know it. DM is the greatest cause of blindness, amputations and kidney failure among working-age adults. About one in seven health care dollars are spent on persons with DM in the United States, and while people with DM represent about 9 percent of Medicare-eligible persons, about 30 percent of Medicare dollars are spent on care for persons with DM.

The really disturbing fact about DM is that many of these problems could be reduced, delayed or prevented today if preventive treatments were widely and effectively applied. Firm scientific data now show that (1) complications can be significantly reduced by improved diabetes control, and (2) the devastation associated with these complications can be controlled by early detection and treatment. For example, about 90 percent of serious visual loss (e.g., blindness) could be prevented by keeping blood glucose levels closer to normal, as well as by early detection of diabetic eye disease and subsequent treatment. Most of these approaches have also been demonstrated to not only help people, but also reduced the cost of diabetes for the nation.

At present, there is not a proven "preventive" or cure for either Type I DM (the type that usually begins in people under 20 and requires insulin) or Type II (95 percent of all people with DM, with onset usually after age 40 in overweight, inactive persons, especially in minority communities). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.