Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Pew's Latest Survey: More Bad News for Newspapers

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Pew's Latest Survey: More Bad News for Newspapers

Article excerpt

The always-interesting results of the biennial news consumption survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press were released Sunday afternoon. Findings on TV news and online-only news produced a few surprises (follow to come), but on the newspaper front the indications were mainly negative, especially on the print front, but also in some aspects of newspapers on the Web.

Namely: while more young people are indeed reading newspapers online, their total readership, print and Web combined, has not grown in two years.

This survey was conducted by telephone from April 30 to June 1 among 3,612 adults nationwide.

Looking first at print, Pew reveals, "This year for the first time in roughly 15 years of asking the question, fewer than half of all Americans report reading a daily newspaper on a regular basis. Only 46% say they read the paper regularly - this number is down from 52% in 2006 and was as high as 71% in 1992. In a similar vein, fewer now report having read a newspaper 'yesterday,' a more reliable measure of newspaper readership. Only 34% say they read a newspaper yesterday, down from 40% in 2006.

"The falloff in readership over the past two years has occurred across the board - men and women, whites and blacks, college graduates and those who never attended college are all reading the newspaper at lower rates than in 2006. Age continues to be strongly correlated with newspaper readership....Currently, only 15% of those younger than 25 report having read a newspaper yesterday. …

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